John Milton’s “On His Blindness”

It’s been a long while since I last posted to this blog, but my son Daniel is memorizing a sonnet that well-deserves mention, attention, and meditation. Most probably aren’t aware this poem even exists, and those who do have perhaps forgotten its weightiness. It is one of the most famous sonnets of Milton, who lived from 1609-1674, and went completely blind by 1655. Most scholars believe this poem was composed at some point during that year.

When I consider how my light is spent
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide
Lodg’d with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lest he returning chide,
“Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?”
I fondly ask. But Patience, to prevent
That murmur, soon replies: “God doth not need
Either man’s work or his own gifts: who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state
Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed
And post o’er land and ocean without rest:
They also serve who only stand and wait.”

How important it is to remember that God does not need our work, or the gifts he has given us; that they who bear the yoke are the ones who “serve him best”; and that it is not only those who are active for the Lord who serve Him –  “they also serve who only stand and wait.”

What trial has he sent into your life, that seemingly has incapacitated you for the service you desire to render unto your heavenly King? Cease murmuring, and wait on Him; endure your hardship with patience and perseverance; don’t see yourself as useless to your Master, but as graciously given another use, another purpose on this earth. And even if it is only waiting on Him, seeking His face, never to serve actively again, do not forget these words: “They also serve who only stand and wait.”

 

 

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